Tag Archive | "non-venomous snakes"

Malayan Bridle Snake – Non Venomous – Not Dangerous

Malayan Bridle Snake - Dryocalamus subannulatus - Not Dangerous

Name: Dryocalamus subannulatus.

I am not 100% on this ID, it could also be a Common Bridle Snake or a Laotian Wolf Snake.

Length: 70cm – measured

Description: This is a thin snake the thickness of a finger. It has black blobs, that can almost be called stripes when looked at from overhead. From the side, as you can see in the image above, the black spots are more like circles stretched out across the body. Further down the snake’s body the stripes change substantially and are completely different in appearance – see 2nd photo below. The eyes of this snake are rather large compared to the very small head. The head is slightly smaller than the neck of the snake. There are two very small rear-fangs seen upon inspection of the mouth. The head of this snake is not elongated in a long triangle like the Lycodon family of snakes – so I’m going with Bridle snake. However, the striking behavior of these snake is identical to Lycodon – in particular the Laotian Wolf Snakes. So, possibility exists that it is that snake, and not a Malayan Bridle Snake.

Range: Thailand’s south and Malaysia. This snake was found in Krabi province.

Habitat: Bushes, trees, and dwellings. This snake is not as common as the Laotian Wolf Snake, but likes the same kind of habitat. Searches trees and structures for geckos primarily. They are excellent climbers and love vines and light brush.

Active Time? Mostly nocturnal.

Food: Small geckos and frogs primarily.

Defensive Behavior: Very inaccurate strikers. They strike almost randomly, just to scare off whatever is bothering them. I’ve been struck at repeatedly and never had her connect with teeth.

Venom Toxicity: Weak or none. Ineffective for humans if there is any venom. The fangs are quite minute – less than the diameter of a regular stick pin.

Offspring: Nothing known about this area.

Notes: These are great snakes, feisty at first, and then, as they get used to people – can be handheld without striking. There is a very real danger of mistaking these harmless snakes with a Malayan, Many Banded, or Banded krait – all of which are deadly. Kraits can get bigger than 1 meter. This snake, and the other harmless black and white banded snakes – will not get over 70cm generally.

Scientific classification: Dryocalamus subannulatus

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Squamata
Suborder: Serpentes
Family: Colubridae
Subfamily: Colubrinae
Genus: Dryocalamus
Species: D. subannulatus

Mid-body photo of Malayan Bridle Snake to show the difference of the stripes in the tail. Here you can see more clearly the true color of the snake which is brown and white, not black and white as might be assumed from the other image.

Video of this Malayan Bridle Snake from Southern Thailand:

Posted in Non-venomous, rear-fangedComments (1)

Othriophis taeniurus helfenbergeri (Helfenbergs Racer) Found in Krabi, Thailand

Othriophis taeniurus helfenberger Helfenbergs Racer, found in Krabi, Thailand at the base of a mountain.

New range for this Othriophis taeniurus helfenberger? Krabi, Thailand

Some herpetologists believe this snake only occurs north of Krabi. I found one today – a juvenile, dead on the road (sea level), at bottom of Khao Phanom Bencha mountain chain where it ends near Krabi Town (Krabi Noi).

Here’s the link to Joachim’s page.

Also saw another Malayan Krait – a juvenile this time. It crawled across my friend’s wife’s foot last night. What a way to find a snake, right. Especially a deadly snake like that one is.

Many snakes out and about right now in Thailand. I’m getting MANY requests for identification and answering them as fast as I can – so please be patient. I’m behind by about a week in answering ID questions.

Again, much better if you can send photos by email to info[{at]}thailandsnakes.com – I answer immediately that way.

Cheers!

Posted in Thailand Snake NotesComments (0)

Indochinese Rat Snake – Non Venomous – Not Dangerous

Indochinese Rat Snake - grey, from Thailand - Ptyas korros

Ptyas korros - Non Venomous - Not Dangerous

Ptyas korros (Indo-Chinese Rat Snake)

Thais say: (ngoo sing baan)

Length: Adults are just over 1 meter.

Range: All over Thailand and most of Asia including: Burma (Myanmar), Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, India, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Laos, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, Western Malaysia, and Singapore.

Habitat: Anywhere rats exist in abundance. They aren’t found on hills or in mountains, usually just the low-lying areas and where people and garbage are.

Active Time? Diurnal – active during daylight hours.

Food: Rats and other rodents, frogs and lizards. Much prefer rats. These are primarily rodent eaters and they vary little from their diet because there are usually plenty of rats available.

Defensive Behavior: Will flee very quickly if given the chance. If agitated, rat snakes bite quickly.

Venom Toxicity: No venom that is harmful to humans.

Offspring:

Notes: These are very common snakes, and are seen a lot because they prefer to be active during the daylight hours. They have very large eyes, which would make one think they can see well at night as well. These snakes can be held without striking (see video below).

Ptyas korros can be silver, grey, or brown – orange looking in color. Scales on the posterior part of the body and on the tail often yellow and edged with black. Underbelly is light yellow. Juvenile Indochinese rat snakes have a transverse series of round whitish spots or narrow yellow transverse bars.

Ptyas korros Scientific classification

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Squamata
Suborder: Serpentes
Family: Colubridae
Genus: Ptyas
Species: korros
Binomial name: Ptyas korros
(Classified by Schlegel in year 1837.)

My Indochinese Rat Snake Photos:

Grey Indochinese rat snake in Thailand

Indochinese rat snakes eat predominantly rats and other rodents.

Another photo, showing same snake but darker exposure. It looks more brown toward the tail:

Indochinese rat snakes are silver, black, grey, brown, or orange in color.

Indochinese rat snakes are silver, black, grey, brown, or orange in color.

Indo-Chinese Rat Snake Video:

Juvenile Indo-Chinese Rat Snake

Posted in Non-venomousComments (2)


 
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Thailand Snakes

 

Cobras in the HOUSE!

Welcome to Thailand Snakes…

Thailand has 200+ snake species with over 60 of them - venomous. I created this site as a way to educate Thais and visitors to Thailand about snakes. Many people kill the snakes they see in Thailand, while in many cases - they are non-venomous and completely harmless. With this site I hope to give people a better idea what is harmful and what isn't.

Browse the many snake photos and videos here so you can identify snakes you see on your porch, in your bed, or underfoot.

If you have been bitten by a snake - go to a hospital FIRST. Don't waste time looking it up on the internet. With some snakes you need to have medical help as fast as possible. With others you have some time. I know a Thai man whose brother died in less than 10 minutes from a snake bite.

There are venomous (some say 'poisonous' erroneously) snakes everywhere in Thailand. Friends have had cobras in their kitchen, and others had kraits in the garage. Vipers love bushes and trees near water and walkways.

Bookmark this site so you can quickly identify snakes you have seen. Notice the variety of venomous and non-venomous snakes in Thailand - and realize that they come in all sizes, shapes, colors, and patterns.

Email - info@thailandsnakes.com

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